La pomme

Delicious in season and available year-round, apples are a great snack to simply bite into! However, whether with a tart or sweet flesh, they also taste great in various dishes, from starters to dessert!

Apple varieties

From McIntosh to Gala, every apple serves a purpose! Check out the variety of apples available, and find out which one will best fit your baking needs.

Photos : © Pommes Qualité Québec (excluding Russet and Crabapple)

Lobo

Lobo

Juicy and with a good crunch, it is slightly tart and sweet.

USES

Great in pies.

Cortland

Cortland

Altogether sweet and tart.

USES

With a white and firm flesh, this apple is great in salads because it doesn't brown fast. It also keeps its shape, so it's ideal for pies, oven-baked apples, and chunky sauces.

Russet

Russet

Sweet, aromatic, and with a refreshing tartness. Its shape is a cross between an apple and a pear.

USES

Great for cidres, as well as for dried or dehydrated apples. Keeps its shape when cooked.

Royal Gala

Royal gala

Very sweet and aromatic, slightly tart. Tastes like pear.

USES

Stays firm when cooked. Great for oven-baked apples or apple confit.

Red delicious

Red Delicious

Sweet and juicy, not too tart.

USES

Great in salads, and for eating. It's not recommended for cooking or baking.

Golden Delicious

Golden Delicious

Sweet and aromatic, slightly tart. Tastes like pear.

USES

With a semi-firm flesh that keeps its shape, it's ideal for pies and oven-baked apples. Also great raw in appetizers, meals and dessert, as it doesn't brown quick.

Crabapple

Crabapple

Tart.

USES

Great in jellies.

McIntosh

McIntosh

Sweet and very juicy.

USES

An (almost!) all-purpose apple. Very juicy, so it's great in applesauces, juices, apple butters, and crisps and crumbles. Softens and breaks up when cooked.

A 200+ YEAR-OLD APPLE!

Everyone knows the McIntosh well; it's that red apple with a hint of green, juicy and crunchy when picked at its peak in September. It is said that it was first discovered by John McIntosh, whereas others suggest it was his son, Allan. Whether it was one or the other, the first descendant of the McIntosh apple was likely eaten for the first time at an Ontario orchard in 1796!

Spartan

Spartan

Altogether tart and sweet. Has a good crunch.

USES

An all-purpose apple. Great for eating, in salads, and in desserts. Keeps its shape when cooked.

Honeycrisp

Honeycrisp

Crunchy and juicy. Sweet with a light honey-like taste.

USES

Skin is thin, and the flesh doesn't brown quick. Great for eating, or in salads.

Empire

Empire

A very firm and very sweet apple, with an excellent crunch. A cross between a McIntosh and a Red Delicious.

USES

An all-purpose apple. Great for snacking, or for caramel- or candy-coated apples. Keeps its shape when cooked.

Paula Red

Paula Red

Juicy, tart and not too sweet. When in season, it boasts a strawberry and red berry aroma.

USES

Great for eating. Also excellent for sauces and purées, juices and pies (in the latter, pair it with apples that keep their shape). Softens and breaks up when cooked.

Apple pie

It's our best-ever recipe!

From the moment we pulled this pie out of the oven, various RICARDO staff members literally rushed to the kitchen to get their hands on a slice!

Get the recipe
Apple pie

Why it's the best

The pastry
Incredibly tasty and flaky. The reason for this? Butter!

The vinegar
For an even lighter crust, we use cider vinegar because it's a good fit with the apples.

The filling
An apple pie should taste like… apples! So to get that flavour, there must be as many as possible. So we decided to pre-cook them before adding them to the pastry.

The choice of apples
The Cortland is an apple pie staple due to its texture that is both firm and capable to break down when cooked. As well as the McIntosh, which softens up perfectly.

The bottom
Want to avoid liquid on the bottom of your pie? Poke a few holes at the bottom using a pastry cutter.

The milk
Brush it on top of the pastry before baking for a golden crust!

Why it's the best:

The pastry
Incredibly tasty and flaky. The reason for this? Butter!

The filling
An apple pie should taste like… apples! So to get that flavour, there must be as many as possible. So we decided to pre-cook them before adding them to the pastry.

The vinegar
For an even lighter crust, we use cider vinegar because it's a good fit with the apples.

The choice of apples
The Cortland is an apple pie staple due to its texture that is both firm and capable to break down when cooked. As well as the McIntosh, which softens up perfectly.

The bottom
Want to avoid liquid on the bottom of your pie? Poke a few holes at the bottom using a pastry cutter.

The milk
Brush it on top of the pastry before baking for a golden crust!